FreeFrom foods, allergy and intolerance – Mintel, March 2011. Alex Gazzola took some notes.

 


Background:

• Gluten-free, lactose-free and lactose-reduced products have seen significant growth in the last few years.
• The number of children with allergies has tripled in the past decade, according to some sources.
• Around 11% of all new food products introduced in the UK are now labelled as “low/no allergen”


Growth:

Market value growth is driven by:
• increased awareness
• media interest
• wider availability of ‘free from’
• greater spending on advertising
• perceived ‘health’ benefits.

In 2002, retail value sales of free from foods was just over £50m.
In 2010, it was £195m.
In 2012, it is forecast to be £350m.


Europe

Percentages of new gluten-free products released around Europe over the last year:
• UK – 29%
• Spain – 15%
• Holland – 9%
• Germany – 9%
• Austria – 6%
• Italy – 6%
• France – 6%

New European gluten-free launches over the last 12 months
• 18% – baby food
• 13% – fish/meat/egg products
• 12% – bakery
• 9% – sauces/seasonings
• 8% – dairy
•8% – snacks.


Percentage of new lactose-free products.
Finland – 28% (Finland have a large lactose intolerant population.)
• Austria – 14%
• Germany – 12%
• UK – 5%.

New lactose-free launches by category, in Europe over the last twelve months:
• Dairy products – 41%
• Processed meat/fish/egg products atc – 16%
• Bakery – 9%
• Desserts/ice cream – 9%.


How many consumers buy 'freefrom foods and why?

5% buy them because they or a family member have food allergies
5% buy them because they or a family member have food intolerances
18% buy them as part of a general healthy lifestyle
72% do not buy ‘free from’

The future

* There’ll be further growth in ‘free from' amongst those buying into it from a health perspective (ie not allergic/intolerant)
* Continued media coverage and celebrity focus may drive growing self-diagnosis and boost growth.
* Price remains an inhibitor to growth
* ‘Free from’ still has perception of being ‘better for you’
* ‘Free from’ foods are often also ‘natural’ (free from animal by-products etc) which may appeal to the mainstream.
* ‘Free from’ could become part of the ‘cultural fabric’ like veggie foods.

 

More articles on free-from foods


Return to freefrom foods home

First Published in March 2011