Cassava starch may improve gluten free bread

 

Sorghum, one of the oldest, naturally gluten-free grains in the world, is favoured for gluten-free bread making because of its greater nutritionally density than, say, potato or rice. But sorghum flour makes rather solid bread because it lacks the elasticity of wheat flour bread, and the dough tends to retain gases produced during the proofing that encourage crust collapse.
Sorghum, one of the oldest, naturally gluten-free grains in the world, is favoured for gluten-free bread making because of its greater nutritionally density than, say, potato or rice. But sorghum flour makes rather solid bread because it lacks the elasticity of wheat flour bread, and the dough tends to retain gases produced during the proofing that encourage crust collapse.

However a new study by Calvin Onyango of the Food Technology Division in Kenya and colleagues has found that with the addition of a plant starch, the composition of the bread is altered to create a less firm, not quite so chewy crumb, and the more starch is added, so the “cohesiveness, springiness and resilience” of the bread increases.

Researchers observed that rice and cassava starch had the best overall effect, but that during storage the bread made with the cassava starch survived better. They also found that breads made with pourable batter had a better crumb than those made with soft dough.

Source: LWT - Food Science and Technology “Modification of gluten-free sorghum batter and bread using maize, potato, cassava or rice starch”
Authors: Calvin Onyango et al, Food Technology Division, Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute, P. O. Box 30650-00100, Nairobi, Kenya
Received 26 March 2010; revised 10 May 2010; accepted 2 September 2010. Available online 21 September 2010.

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First Published in March 2010